Nova Silbaugh Art

Art, the Incredible Dream.

Category: Imagination

Metamorphosis Journey

This week wrapped up the big show, so I’m getting a bit of rest before I finish my final paintings in my “Metamorphosis” series. I have 2 more that I have started and sit yet unfinished.

The idea behind “Metamorphosis” started a little over a year ago with a small drawing of a woman lying beneath a tree. I set it aside for several months not knowing what it would turn into. It was really on a whim that I decided to paint her. Much of my work comes from a gut feeling, I don’t always make plans, but when I find something I love I go with it. This time I knew it was something special.

Artist Nova Art Painting 20_2013_2THUMB

The characters within “Metamorphosis” represent a journey of change. I envisioned the ability of each person to create a better person from within, and each person represents a different stage within this journey. My objective was to convey a positive message of change, and to get others to envision their own personal journey and to question personal destination. This was a fitting theme for my work, as my work its self has experienced a metamorphosis. Personally it was my journey to create something better, to be a more focused person, and to become a person who dares to share her dreams.

“Do Not Be Silenced, but Share From the Vastness of Your Dreams” is my largest piece for the series. For this painting the title came to me first. I spend some time writing in a notebook while in my studio. Sometimes just bit and pieces of thought. This was a kind of a poetry of thought that floated into my head, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I decided to quite literally translate this thought into my painting.

Do not be Silenced artwork by Nova SIlbaugh art painting

This painting really summed up what some of my artistic journey was about. Sometimes I suffer from self censoring, put too much importance on what others think I should be doing. This is something I think a lot of artists struggle with as well. Its rough putting yourself out there and being a vulnerable creative. This painting represents that breaking free of those limitations.

Advertisements

Frida Kahlo to Marty McConnell

by Marty McConnell

“leaving is not enough; you must
stay gone. train your heart
like a dog. change the locks
even on the house he’s never
visited. you lucky, lucky girl.
you have an apartment
just your size. a bathtub
full of tea. a heart the size
of Arizona, but not nearly
so arid. don’t wish away
your cracked past, your
crooked toes, your problems
are papier mache puppets
you made or bought because the vendor
at the market was so compelling you just
had to have them. you had to have him.
and you did. and now you pull down
the bridge between your houses,
you make him call before
he visits, you take a lover
for granted, you take
a lover who looks at you
like maybe you are magic. make
the first bottle you consume
in this place a relic. place it
on whatever altar you fashion
with a knife and five cranberries.
don’t lose too much weight.
stupid girls are always trying
to disappear as revenge. and you
are not stupid. you loved a man
with more hands than a parade
of beggars, and here you stand. heart
like a four-poster bed. heart like a canvas.
heart leaking something so strong
they can smell it in the street.”

McConnell is a contemporary poet who, in this work, imagines receiving relationship advice from the late Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, who, as we know, faced her own set of romantic upheavals—she counted Diego Rivera, Isamu Noguchi, and Josephine Baker among her lovers. But despite the specificity of its title, this poem could just as well have been written for any woman who has ever left a relationship behind in order to open herself up to better, truer possibilities. A good reminder to us all—whether we’re years beyond our last break-up, or still freshly reeling.
reblogged this from peelsofpoetry via: http://peelsofpoetry.tumblr.com/post/34524527364/frida-kahlo-to-marty-mcconnell-by-marty-mcconnell

frida-kahlo-by-nickolas-muray

Frida Kahlo’s Imaginary Friend

Several months ago, while on a walk, I rescued a book that was lying in the middle a street. It so happens that this book was “Inspirations: Stories of Women Artists,” which included Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, Alice Neel, and Faith Ringgold. It was an introduction to the artists, and probably meant for middle school children, but I enjoyed it anyway.

One tidbit of information I picked up from it was that Frida Kahlo had an imaginary friend as a child. I’ve read quite a bit about her, and this is the first time that I had heard this. Frida has been a favorite artist of mine, and has served as inspiration from many of my art pieces. Not so much stylistically, but in what her art expressed. She wasn’t afraid to show her emotion through symbolism, even if it was drawn from painful events; like a mirror to the soul.

Frida3

I had been thinking  a lot about inner voice, like a persons second self, and expression of inner turmoil and emotion. This idea is reflected in my drawings such as “Solace” and is a continuing theme of many drawings I’ve been working on featuring interconnected people. I have the habit of often talking to myself, like an imaginary friend, this is how the idea came about. When I heard the Frida had an imaginary friend, this sparked an idea for tribute to the artist.

NovaArt3_2014 Art Artist Drawing Illustration

“Frida Kahlo: My Imaginary Friend” is done in my own style. I used “2 Fridas” as reference to how the figures are placed.

Frida_Kahlo_The_Two_Fridas

The Frida on the left is the rejected Frida with a broken heart in the modern dress Frida wore in the past. The Frida to the right has a whole heart and is in the traditional Mexican dress she became known for wearing; she is holding a small portrait of her husband Diego.

In my drawing I’ve replaced the “rejected Frida” with myself. I look to Frida, while she looks out.  Frida holds a small Mexican art figurine instead of Diego. The pattern around her face is a pattern found in some of her paintings on her dress. In my hand is a mirror with the reflection of a healthy heart. In a whole this is a reflection of our best selves as women and artists.

“I never paint dreams or nightmares. I paint my own reality.”~ Frida Kahlo

Why is Art Important? (My Reblog from the DLC)

I wrote this post for the Discovery Learning Center last week and wanted to share it again here.

Enjoy…

Why is Art Important?

The question is not an easy task for some. Art easily takes a back seat to reading, math, science, and even sports in education these days. And it certainly isn’t on the latest test.

But ask yourself…

Can a lesson in composition resound with a future web designer, or a lesson on perspective later help with geometry? Or perhaps learning color theory will help a future physicist understand how light works? How about the visual and contemplative of any art piece that could inspire a poem, the next great work of literature, or any myriad of invention.

Art education is something that is as important in the classroom as it is in the real world. Art helps a person grow and to appreciate; to see the world from art’s own creative perspective. It helps one become a more rounded and cultured human being . Art isn’t just for the “artsy” either; any person can learn to appreciate art. Creating a piece of art can make a person find something in themselves they have not seen before, regardless if they have “talent” or not.

Art education creates thinkers, innovators, problem solvers, communicators, humanitarians. It nurtures the development of self-esteem, self-discipline, cooperation, and self-motivation. Art helps a person to understand the human experience and helps to shape our identity.

Even the great innovators of the past and of today know and understand the importance of art as a part of education.

“In my own philanthropy and business endeavors, I have seen the critical role that the arts play in stimulating creativity and in developing vital communities….the arts have a crucial impact on our economy and are an important catalyst for learning, discovery, and achievement in our country.”
–Paul G. Allen, Co-Founder, Microsoft

“It is in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough—it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.”
–Steve Jobs, in introducing the iPad 2 in 2011

“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.”
–Albert Einstein

The Discovery Learning Center runs many art and creative based classes from fine art to tie dye. Join us for the next Art and Great Artists Friday August 24th at 10 a.m. Or check the calendar for the latest workshop.