Nova Silbaugh Art

Art, the Incredible Dream.

Tag: Frida

Frida Kahlo to Marty McConnell

by Marty McConnell

“leaving is not enough; you must
stay gone. train your heart
like a dog. change the locks
even on the house he’s never
visited. you lucky, lucky girl.
you have an apartment
just your size. a bathtub
full of tea. a heart the size
of Arizona, but not nearly
so arid. don’t wish away
your cracked past, your
crooked toes, your problems
are papier mache puppets
you made or bought because the vendor
at the market was so compelling you just
had to have them. you had to have him.
and you did. and now you pull down
the bridge between your houses,
you make him call before
he visits, you take a lover
for granted, you take
a lover who looks at you
like maybe you are magic. make
the first bottle you consume
in this place a relic. place it
on whatever altar you fashion
with a knife and five cranberries.
don’t lose too much weight.
stupid girls are always trying
to disappear as revenge. and you
are not stupid. you loved a man
with more hands than a parade
of beggars, and here you stand. heart
like a four-poster bed. heart like a canvas.
heart leaking something so strong
they can smell it in the street.”

McConnell is a contemporary poet who, in this work, imagines receiving relationship advice from the late Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, who, as we know, faced her own set of romantic upheavals—she counted Diego Rivera, Isamu Noguchi, and Josephine Baker among her lovers. But despite the specificity of its title, this poem could just as well have been written for any woman who has ever left a relationship behind in order to open herself up to better, truer possibilities. A good reminder to us all—whether we’re years beyond our last break-up, or still freshly reeling.
reblogged this from peelsofpoetry via: http://peelsofpoetry.tumblr.com/post/34524527364/frida-kahlo-to-marty-mcconnell-by-marty-mcconnell

frida-kahlo-by-nickolas-muray

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Frida Kahlo’s Imaginary Friend

Several months ago, while on a walk, I rescued a book that was lying in the middle a street. It so happens that this book was “Inspirations: Stories of Women Artists,” which included Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, Alice Neel, and Faith Ringgold. It was an introduction to the artists, and probably meant for middle school children, but I enjoyed it anyway.

One tidbit of information I picked up from it was that Frida Kahlo had an imaginary friend as a child. I’ve read quite a bit about her, and this is the first time that I had heard this. Frida has been a favorite artist of mine, and has served as inspiration from many of my art pieces. Not so much stylistically, but in what her art expressed. She wasn’t afraid to show her emotion through symbolism, even if it was drawn from painful events; like a mirror to the soul.

Frida3

I had been thinking  a lot about inner voice, like a persons second self, and expression of inner turmoil and emotion. This idea is reflected in my drawings such as “Solace” and is a continuing theme of many drawings I’ve been working on featuring interconnected people. I have the habit of often talking to myself, like an imaginary friend, this is how the idea came about. When I heard the Frida had an imaginary friend, this sparked an idea for tribute to the artist.

NovaArt3_2014 Art Artist Drawing Illustration

“Frida Kahlo: My Imaginary Friend” is done in my own style. I used “2 Fridas” as reference to how the figures are placed.

Frida_Kahlo_The_Two_Fridas

The Frida on the left is the rejected Frida with a broken heart in the modern dress Frida wore in the past. The Frida to the right has a whole heart and is in the traditional Mexican dress she became known for wearing; she is holding a small portrait of her husband Diego.

In my drawing I’ve replaced the “rejected Frida” with myself. I look to Frida, while she looks out.  Frida holds a small Mexican art figurine instead of Diego. The pattern around her face is a pattern found in some of her paintings on her dress. In my hand is a mirror with the reflection of a healthy heart. In a whole this is a reflection of our best selves as women and artists.

“I never paint dreams or nightmares. I paint my own reality.”~ Frida Kahlo

Some Work in Progress

A bit from my sketchbook…

This Frida is always staring at me from my desk, so I decided to draw her…

A mother and child…

Perhaps a future painting…


Some finished paintings…

And one that is not…